More cash found in Chief Justice of Nigeria’s accounts.

Detectives may have found more “suspicious” funds in Chief Justice of Nigeria, Walter Onnoghen’s accounts, TheNation reports.
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There are also “suspicious” transactions, including an $800,000 Standard Chartered Bank investment subscription, the report said.
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Also found is $630,000 lodged in some of the accounts through what is described as “structured payments” in tranches of $10,000 each.
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Most of the lodgments, effected between 2012 and 2016, were undeclared in Justice Onnoghen’s assets declaration form, sources claimed.
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The Nigerian Financial Intelligence Unit (NFIU) has restricted the operation of five accounts with about $3million.
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Detectives believe that most of the lodgments and transactions are “suspicious”.
An intelligence report on the CJN’s accounts reads in part: “Pattern of structured payments of $10,000 each in 2012. .
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For example, a total of $630,000 was credited to the accounts using this pattern. Similarly structured payments of $10,000 amounting to $297,800, $50,000 and $36,000 were deposited in the account in 2013, 2015 and 2016 respectively.
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There was also a credit of $121,116 into the account from 2014 to 2016 from Life Friend Plc. The payments were in four installments, of $30,279 each. These payments suggest the suspect has investments.
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A payment at $482,966 from Alicia Redemption Pro and shortly after, $800,000 was invested in SCB Investment subscription. We are in the process of verifying these transactions;
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Other suspicious transactions in the account are credit of $19,764 from Pur of Noble and seven payments of $3,250, each amounting to $22,750 from Lloyds TSB.
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On the pound sterling (GBP), the investigative team discovered “a self- transfer of £40,268 into the account on May 31, 2016.” .
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There were also self-deposits by the suspect of £49,760 from July 2015 to September, 2016, but the balance as at September 30, 2016 was £108,348.”
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All the transactions are being investigated whether or not they violated the “Revised Code of Conduct for Judicial Officers of the Federal Republic of Nigeria.”